About GitHub Sponsors for open source contributors

If you provide value to an open source project, you can become a sponsored contributor to receive payments for your work.

In this article

Note: GitHub Sponsors for organizations is currently in beta and subject to change.

Joining GitHub Sponsors

Anyone who contributes to an open source project and has a bank account in a country supported by Stripe Connect is eligible to become a sponsored developer. Contributions include but are not limited to bug reports, issue triage, code, documentation, leadership, business development, project management, mentorship, and design. For more information, see "Setting up GitHub Sponsors for your user account."

After you become a sponsored developer, you can add a sponsor button to the open source repository you contribute to, to increase the visibility of your GitHub Sponsors profile and other funding platforms. For more information, see "Displaying a sponsor button in your repository."

There are a small number of sponsored organizations currently participating in the limited beta. Any organization that contributes to an open source project and has a dedicated bank account for your organization in a country supported by Stripe Connect is eligible to become a sponsored organization. For a list of supported countries, see "Setting up GitHub Sponsors for your user account." To request access to the next beta phase for sponsored organizations, join the waitlist at GitHub Sponsors. For more information, see "Setting up GitHub Sponsors for your organization."

Sponsorship tiers

Sponsored developers can create up to ten sponsorship tiers for sponsors to choose from. Each tier has its own monthly payment amount and benefits, such as receiving early access to new versions or being featured in the project's README.

Once you have a sponsor on a tier, you can't edit the price of that tier. Instead, you must retire the tier and create a new tier. Existing sponsors will remain on the retired tier until they change their sponsorship tier or cancel their sponsorship. For more information, see "Setting up GitHub Sponsors for your user account," "Setting up GitHub Sponsors for your organization, and "Changing your sponsorship tiers."

Sponsorship payouts

To supercharge community funding, GitHub created the GitHub Sponsors Matching Fund, which matches up to $5000 USD total per sponsored developer in their first year, or 12 months, of sponsorship. During the matching period, GitHub will not charge any fees, so 100% of sponsorships will go to the sponsored developer. In the future, we may charge a nominal processing fee.

To prevent abuse, some developer sponsorship payments are not eligible for matching. For privacy reasons, GitHub can only discuss the reason a payment is not matched with the sponsor. Organization sponsorship payments are not eligible for matching.

You will be eligible for payment 90 days after the first person sponsors you. After this period, GitHub will issue a payment to you for any month that your balance reaches $100 USD. Contributions from the GitHub Sponsors Matching Fund do not count towards this threshold.

Payments are sent through Stripe Connect, ACH transfer, or wire transfer to the bank account you provide while applying for GitHub Sponsors. If you are paid through Stripe Connect, you will receive payments on the 22nd of the month for your balance at the end of the previous month. If you are paid through ACH transfer or wire transfer, you will receive payments on the 3rd Thursday of the month.

If your balance is below $100 at the end of the month, the balance will accrue until the next time your balance is above the threshold at the end of the month. If you leave GitHub Sponsors, GitHub will issue a payment for your remaining balance even if the balance is below $100. For more information, "Setting up GitHub Sponsors for your user account" or "Setting up GitHub Sponsors for your organization.

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